When we moved out to the sticks, little did I know that we’d be moving closer to an ASCP stockest and I’d no longer need to order paint. 

What I didn’t fully appreciate is having someone experienced with ASCP so close at hand. They readily share tips and information while chatting and help with troubleshooting when needed. (I’ll share about the spot I was in with a set of commissioned chairs and how they helped me fix it later.)

It makes a difference to be able to see the colors in person and touch and feel the pieces someone else has finished and learn from their experience. That’s how I fell head-over-heals for Coco, but that’s another story.

One thing I noticed about their pieces is the super smooth, sliky finish the table tops had. It’s a buffing grade, super fine 600 grit sandpaper that does it! Now I love giving my pieces that extra fine finishing touch!

They also share my love for lining the drawers of our pieces. I usually use paper (old books, scrap book paper, magazines, etc.), but with this piece I used fabric. 

What I learned this time around was: use a super clean brush when applying the top coats of sealer. I didn’t notice that my brush had bits of dried black paint left in it and when I brushed on the sealer I also left a trail of paint flakes.

lessons learned . . . 

  1. Use a buffing paper or 600 grit sandpaper for the tops and flat areas of a piece before waxing. The resulting finish feels like silk.
  2. When decoupaging, be sure your brush is thoroughly clean with no crusty paint remaining on the bristles before you add the top coat of sealer. 
  3. Keep a top-secret, designated brush for decoupaging only so as to avoid this problem. (Note to self: hide said brush from hubby and kids with the fabric scissors!)
  4. Small flakes, lint, dog hair or little hairs shedding from the decoupage brush can be sanded out when sanding between coats of sealer.

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2 thoughts on “buffing paper and clean brushes

  1. I have been receiving e-mail updates from this site for over a year—and this is the first time I'm commenting; but I must say–I love this site. I love the recreation of furniture, and I love your sweet heart! I'm in the very beginning planning process of refinishing my grandmother's antique sewing table for my craft room, and I'm nervous! But, looking over your pieces, and reading over your “lessons learned” is making me feel more brave! Thank you for sharing!

    p.s.
    What color paint is this? I LOVE it!

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  2. Thank you for your sweet comments! This is Annie Sloan Chalk Paint in Provence with clear wax. I have a few family pieces that I wouldn't blink an eye at changing if they weren't from the family. Not sure why that makes me hesitate, but it does. Someday I'll get brave enough and wonder why I waited! It's ok to make family pieces our own and put our own mark on them. It's part of the story. I'd love to see the sewing table if you refinish it! –Analisa

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